Collector’s Corner

Untitled

Untitled

Tingari

Timmy Payungka Tjapangati c1940 - 2000. Born at Lake Mackay in Western Australia, he and his wife were bought to the government settlement at Papunya in the Northern Territory, from the Kintore region during the early 1960's. Timmy became one of the original painting men of the Papunya Tula artist group with Geoffrey Bardon. Bardon suspected Timmy to be a Kadaitcha Man, an enforcer of tribal law, because of his knowledge of stories and rituals. Payungka's Tingari works featured circles which represented sit down places, linked with straight lines for travelling. They were essentially maps of his homeland depicting such things as water, food sources and places of spiritual significance.

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Bush Potato

Acknowledged as one of the great innovators of the Warlpiri art movement from Lajamanu, Lorna Napurrula Fencer (1923- 2006) was both a fierce and gentle custodian of her culture. She painted the great Napurrula-Nakamarra creation stories from her brother’s custodial site at Yurmurrpa. These ceremonial stories re-enact the myths of the Ancestors who dug out the first yarla, or bush potato, from the earth around the underground water source at Yurmurrpa.

Embedded in the swirling shapes of the bush potato leaves are the “U” shapes of the Napurrula and Nakamarra women, who remain the custodians and the beneficiaries of their great Ancestors’ achievements. The travels of Napurrula and Nakamarrra kinship or skin groups are the inspiration for Lorna Fencer Napurrula’s work, and she was a custodian of the Dreamings associated with bush potato (yarla), caterpillar (luju), bush onion, yam, bush tomato, bush plum, many different seeds, and (importantly) water.

Lorna Napurrula Fencer was a senior Warlpiri artist, born at Yartulu Yartulu, and custodian of inherited lands of Yumurrpa in the Tanami Desert. In 1949 many Warlpiri people, including Lorna Napurrula Fencer were forcibly moved from Yuendumu community by the government, to go a settlement at Lajamanu 250 miles north in the country of the Gurindji people. Napurrula managed to maintain and strengthen her cultural commitment through ceremonial activity and art, and asserted her position as a prominent elder figure in the community. Lorna Napurrula Fencer began her painting in the mid 1980s.

Lorna Napurrula Fencer at her best is recognised as an artist who was a master of colour, carefully considering the impact as she laid down the paint on the canvas. Her large epic canvases created in the eighth decade of her life were final and compelling statements about the power of the great Warlpiri stories that she painted for over twenty years.

Lorna’s mother’s country was Yumurrpa. This is where the Yarla (Yam or Big Bush Potato) Dreaming track begins on its travels north toward Lajamanu. Her father’s country was Wapurtali, home of the little bush potato. Before she began painting on canvas in the mid 1980s, Lorna Napurrula Fencer painted on traditional women’s coolamons and digging sticks.

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Caterpillar

Acknowledged as one of the great innovators of the Warlpiri art movement from Lajamanu, Lorna Napurrula Fencer (1923- 2006) was both a fierce and gentle custodian of her culture. She painted the great Napurrula-Nakamarra creation stories from her brother’s custodial site at Yurmurrpa. These ceremonial stories re-enact the myths of the Ancestors who dug out the first yarla, or bush potato, from the earth around the underground water source at Yurmurrpa.

Embedded in the swirling shapes of the bush potato leaves are the “U” shapes of the Napurrula and Nakamarra women, who remain the custodians and the beneficiaries of their great Ancestors’ achievements. The travels of Napurrula and Nakamarrra kinship or skin groups are the inspiration for Lorna Fencer Napurrula’s work, and she was a custodian of the Dreamings associated with bush potato (yarla), caterpillar (luju), bush onion, yam, bush tomato, bush plum, many different seeds, and (importantly) water.

Lorna Napurrula Fencer was a senior Warlpiri artist, born at Yartulu Yartulu, and custodian of inherited lands of Yumurrpa in the Tanami Desert. In 1949 many Warlpiri people, including Lorna Napurrula Fencer were forcibly moved from Yuendumu community by the government, to go a settlement at Lajamanu 250 miles north in the country of the Gurindji people. Napurrula managed to maintain and strengthen her cultural commitment through ceremonial activity and art, and asserted her position as a prominent elder figure in the community. Lorna Napurrula Fencer began her painting in the mid 1980s.

Lorna Napurrula Fencer at her best is recognised as an artist who was a master of colour, carefully considering the impact as she laid down the paint on the canvas. Her large epic canvases created in the eighth decade of her life were final and compelling statements about the power of the great Warlpiri stories that she painted for over twenty years.

Lorna’s mother’s country was Yumurrpa. This is where the Yarla (Yam or Big Bush Potato) Dreaming track begins on its travels north toward Lajamanu. Her father’s country was Wapurtali, home of the little bush potato. Before she began painting on canvas in the mid 1980s, Lorna Napurrula Fencer painted on traditional women’s coolamons and digging sticks.

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Wildflowers

Acknowledged as one of the great innovators of the Warlpiri art movement from Lajamanu, Lorna Napurrula Fencer (1923- 2006) was both a fierce and gentle custodian of her culture. She painted the great Napurrula-Nakamarra creation stories from her brother’s custodial site at Yurmurrpa. These ceremonial stories re-enact the myths of the Ancestors who dug out the first yarla, or bush potato, from the earth around the underground water source at Yurmurrpa.

Embedded in the swirling shapes of the bush potato leaves are the “U” shapes of the Napurrula and Nakamarra women, who remain the custodians and the beneficiaries of their great Ancestors’ achievements. The travels of Napurrula and Nakamarrra kinship or skin groups are the inspiration for Lorna Fencer Napurrula’s work, and she was a custodian of the Dreamings associated with bush potato (yarla), caterpillar (luju), bush onion, yam, bush tomato, bush plum, many different seeds, and (importantly) water.

Lorna Napurrula Fencer was a senior Warlpiri artist, born at Yartulu Yartulu, and custodian of inherited lands of Yumurrpa in the Tanami Desert. In 1949 many Warlpiri people, including Lorna Napurrula Fencer were forcibly moved from Yuendumu community by the government, to go a settlement at Lajamanu 250 miles north in the country of the Gurindji people. Napurrula managed to maintain and strengthen her cultural commitment through ceremonial activity and art, and asserted her position as a prominent elder figure in the community. Lorna Napurrula Fencer began her painting in the mid 1980s.

Lorna Napurrula Fencer at her best is recognised as an artist who was a master of colour, carefully considering the impact as she laid down the paint on the canvas. Her large epic canvases created in the eighth decade of her life were final and compelling statements about the power of the great Warlpiri stories that she painted for over twenty years.

Lorna’s mother’s country was Yumurrpa. This is where the Yarla (Yam or Big Bush Potato) Dreaming track begins on its travels north toward Lajamanu. Her father’s country was Wapurtali, home of the little bush potato. Before she began painting on canvas in the mid 1980s, Lorna Napurrula Fencer painted on traditional women’s coolamons and digging sticks.

$8,800.00Add to cart

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Tingari

Ronnie Tjampitjinpa was born around 1943 at Tjiturrunya in the region near Munyinnga about 100km west of the Kintore Ranges in Western Australia. Ronnie Tjampitjinpa’s family travelled extensively across Pintupi territory, moving throughout this region and also in the area around Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay) which straddles the Western Australia – Northern Territory border. Ronnie Tjampitjinpa was initiated into Aboriginal Law at Yumari, near his birthplace.
After prolonged droughts in the 1950s, Ronnie moved with his family, first to Haasts Bluff, then to Papunya. Over the years, moving between Aboriginal communities station, Ronnie Tjampitjinpa talked to many people about returning to traditional lands, a move which was made possible with the establishment of Kintore (Walungurru) in 1981. Ronnie moved there with his family in the early 1980s and has since emerged as one of Papunya Tula Artists’ major painters. Today, Ronnie remains an important influence on a new generation of painters.

Ronnie Tjampijinpa’s art is a fine representation of the characteristic Pintupi sytle: a repetition of forms, which are geometric, simple and bold, and pigments which are often restricted to the four basic colours of black, red, yellow and white, although Ronnie also experiments with other colours.

The primary imagery in Ronnie Tjampitjinpa’s work are based on the Tingari Cycle which is a secret song cycle sacred to initiated Pintupi men. The Tingari are Ancestral Beings who, in the Creation Era, travelled across the landscape performing ceremonies to create and shape the country. Ronnie Tjampitjinpa’s art consistently reflects his direct ties with his culture and he can be considered amongst the first wave of artists effectively linking these ancient stories with modern mediums.

Ronnie Tjampitjinpa’s works first appeared in Papunya Tula exhibitions during the 1970s, then in commercial art galleries in Sydney and Melbourne throughout the 1980s.

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Womens Ceremonial Body Paint

Narpula Scobie Napurrula was born near Haasts Bluff in 1950, and grew up there before later moving onto Pintupi homelands around Papunya and then later to Kintore. Narpula Scobie Napurrula’s parents were Toba Tjakamarra and Nganyima Napaltjarri, and her brother was the late artist Turkey Tolson Tjupurrula.

Narpula was married to Johnny Scobie Tjapanangka and assisted him by painting backgrounds to his paintings as well as starting to paint her own works at Papunya in 1982. During this time, until the mid 1990s, Narpula Scobie Napurrula was the only woman Pintupi artist working in any of the communities of Papunya, Kintore and Kiwirrkura.

When her husband Johnny Scobie Tjapanangka died in 2000, Narpula Scobie Napurrula moved to the community of Mt Liebig with her daughter-in-law Fabrianne Peterson, who had also begun painting alongside Narpula in the late 1980s. Narpula Scobie Napurrula has mostly worked as an independent artist since 2000, and her paintings had been exhibited internationally in UK and China in the later 1980s.

Narpula Scobie Napurrula paints subjects associated with the Dreaming stories of her brother Turkey Tolson Tjupurrula, as well as images of Women’s ceremonies and ritual body painting motifs. One of the women’s stories relates to the ancestral women who travelled from the south at Mitukatjirra travelling to Ngutjul then on to locations to the north-west.

$3,750.00Add to cart

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Uwalki - Watiya Tjuta

Uwalki - Watiya Tjuta

Uwalki - Watiya Tjuta

Uwalki - Watiya Tjuta

Uwalki - Watiya Tjuta

Uwalki - Watiya Tjuta